Tag: Museum

The Queen’s Art Collection

Posted by Published on March 8, 2017

The Royal Collection is the art collection of the British Royal Family and one of the largest and most important art collections in the world, spanning over 500 years of history. Discover stories behind some of the paintings that can be viewed in the royal palaces.   The Nubian Giraffe by Jacques-Laurent Agasse The giraffe in this painting was one of three giraffes given as gifts by…

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The Sheldon Tapestry Map of Warwickshire is the only complete survivor from a set of four tapestry maps commissioned in the 1590s by Ralph Sheldon for his new home of Weston House in South Warwickshire.   The tapestries depicted the counties of Warwickshire, Worcestershire, Oxfordshire and  Gloucestershire, and were made to hang together to present a dramatic and colourful panorama of the English Midlands stretching from London to the Bristol…

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 Sir Sidney Nolan’s Ned Kelly paintings have formed some of the most recognisable imagery in Australia. The stylised figurative descriptions of Australia’s most notorious bushranger set in a sunburnt outback elicit memories of Australia’s recent British history. Painted mostly between 1946 and 1947, the works were made during a period in which the artist lived and worked side by side with other Australian Modernist artists…

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The house-museum of Sir John Soane (1753-1837) – English architect, Royal Academician and avid collector – holds one of the most intriguing and memorable collections of painting, sculpture and architecture in the world. Originally designed as a study resource for young architecture students, Sir John Soane’s Museum is now best loved for its surprising finds and secret spaces. Take a virtual tour of the house and…

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10 Iconic British Football Moments

Posted by Published on February 8, 2017

Let’s celebrate the ‘beautiful game’ with a chronological countdown of 10 iconic moments in Britain’s footballing history   1. The Football Association (FA) was formed on 26 October 1863. While it’s highly debatable whether football was invented in Britain (or China, or Greece, or…) it is this sporting body which developed modern football as we know it.   2. 1885 saw the first professional footballers…

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There is something incredibly intimate about looking into someone’s sketchbooks, a raw, naked exposure into the mind of an individual. This was the feeling that I had when I was invited to the National Portrait Gallery for a private viewing (and breakfast) at the Lucian Freud sketchbook exhibition, and I loved it.  Walking into the exhibition space it was nice to actually have some, space that is!…

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Bethlem Museum of the Mind

Posted by Published on April 19, 2016

Bethlem Museum of the Mind, the pioneering new gallery and museum at the world’s oldest psychiatric hospital, Bethlem Royal Hospital at Beckenham, south London, has been named as one of the finalists competing for the Art Fund Prize for Museum of the Year 2016. Situated within the hospital grounds, Bethlem Museum of the Mind was formally opened by artist Grayson Perry in March 2015.  The…

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Enjoy War & Peace? Well, if that’s wetted your appetite for the “Golden Age” of Russian literature and culture, catch the latest exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. As part of an exchange with Moscow, Russia and the Arts: The Age of Tolstoy and Tchaikovsky coincides with an exhibition of loaned portraits of famous Britons at the prestigious State Tretyakov Gallery this year to celebrate both galleries 160th birthdays….

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Fashion Designers: Inspired by Art

Posted by Published on March 10, 2016

Fashion and art have always had a close relationship, and designers often look to paintings for creative inspiration. This season of exhibitions has had a particularly prominent focus on fashion, with the V&A hosting the first and largest ever retrospective of Alexander McQueen’s works in Europe. Using the Bridgeman archive as our guide, explore how fashion designers have borrowed from parallel art movements and art history for…

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10 orphans from literature

Posted by Published on February 9, 2016

The exhibition ‘Drawing on Childhood‘ is currently on display at The Foundling Museum and encompasses the work of key illustrators from the 18th century to the present day, depicting images of fictional characters who are orphaned, adopted, fostered or found. A long time favourite theme in European folklore and fiction these orphaned children find themselves without any parental guidance and are therefore able to carve…

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