Tag: 1917

The 29th May 2017 will mark 100 years since the birth of one of the most popular US presidents in history. John Fitzgerald ‘Jack’ Kennedy, also known as JFK, captured the hearts of the public during his time as America’s 35th president, up until his untimely death via assassination in 1963. The Bridgeman Footage archive is home to candid clips of JFK with his wife and…

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 Sir Sidney Nolan’s Ned Kelly paintings have formed some of the most recognisable imagery in Australia. The stylised figurative descriptions of Australia’s most notorious bushranger set in a sunburnt outback elicit memories of Australia’s recent British history. Painted mostly between 1946 and 1947, the works were made during a period in which the artist lived and worked side by side with other Australian Modernist artists…

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After the Communist revolution in 1917, the new government took control of the art establishment in Russia, nationalising all art collections and laying down the principles that were to govern the creation of works of art. A movement was initiated to put all arts to service of the dictatorship of the proletariat. Clarity and exactitude as opposed to subjectivity and individualism With Constructivism, the Russian…

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The Oscar winning actor Leonardo DiCaprio recently called for more films on Russian history and says he would like to play Lenin or Rasputin. In the run up to the centenary of the Russian Revolution we quite agree and thought it might be useful for researchers to highlight archive footage of the politics, people and major events in Russia from the last century. Russian history…

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The Russian Revolutions of 1917

Posted by Published on February 6, 2017

  In 2017, the world will mark the hundredth anniversary of the Russian Revolutions, a dramatic series of political occurrences with consequences that are still being felt today. Tobie Mathew discusses his own collection of pictures related to these events, which are listed exclusively with Bridgeman Images.   There is something extraordinary about seeing historical images of dramatic upheaval; the frisson of excitement that filters…

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The Battle of the Somme is, rightly so, best remembered for the stupefying number of casualties that were inflicted on both sides between July 1st and November 18th 1916. Estimates vary greatly but some historians suggest the number of killed and wounded exceded 1 million. It was remarkable even in the context of World War 1. The British public at the time was not unaccustomed…

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Enjoy War & Peace? Well, if that’s wetted your appetite for the “Golden Age” of Russian literature and culture, catch the latest exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. As part of an exchange with Moscow, Russia and the Arts: The Age of Tolstoy and Tchaikovsky coincides with an exhibition of loaned portraits of famous Britons at the prestigious State Tretyakov Gallery this year to celebrate both galleries 160th birthdays….

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9 September 2015 marked a historic landmark for the nation, as Queen Elizabeth became the longest reigning monarch in British history. In doing so, she broke the record held for over a century by her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria, who served for 63 years and seven months. The beloved Queen has had an extraordinary lifetime devoted to public service, and also celebrated her 90th birthday in April 2016. June…

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