Category: History

Gallipoli Campaign 25 April 1915 – 9 January 1916 The Gallipoli Campaign was one of the Allies’ major disasters of  World War One. Carried out between 25th April 1915 and 9th January 1916 on the Gallipoli peninsula in the Ottoman Empire, the doomed campaign was spearheaded by Winston Churchill in the hope of creating a new war-front that the Ottomans could not cope with. The…

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It’s National Pet Month, an annual celebration of our furry friends, beloved birds, amphibious acquaintances and everything in between! This year National Pet Month is running from 01 April – 04 May, and in honour of this occasion we’re sharing a collection of some of our favourite paintings of canine companions. (Don’t worry cat lovers, there’ll be a post for you too!) People have been depicting domestic…

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“The Seurat of Sussex” Laura Cumming, The Observer The first major exhibition curated by James Russell to survey watercolours by celebrated British artist Eric Ravilious opened on 1 April 2015 at the Dulwich Picture Gallery. Well known for his iconic work for Wedgwood, Ravilious is widely considered one of the key figures in mid-20th century British design but he was also one of the finest watercolourists…

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The V&A is hosting the first and largest retrospective in Europe of one of the most innovative fashion designers of recent times. ‘Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty‘ showcases his visionary body of work, spanning from his graduate collection to the final pieces before his untimely death. Bridgeman’s Head of Sales in Berlin, Ute Krebs, shares her thoughts about the celebratory exhibition, alongside selected fashion pieces from…

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Kiss Me, Though I Might Not Be Irish

Posted by Published on March 1, 2015

March 17 marks the anniversary of the death of St. Patrick (387-461), which has evolved from a sombre religious holiday commemorating the patron saint of Ireland to a day synonymous with busy, and often drunken, festivities particularly in North America. Enjoy a few facts about these celebrations to get excited about the Irish food, drinks, and kisses you might share on this year’s St. Paddy’s…

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Forty days & Forty nights

Posted by Published on February 1, 2015

Ash Wednesday kicks off the season for reflection and restraint. Seek inspiration from the archive for your Lent resolutions.  1 – Lose Weight & Get In Shape Take solace in the fact that losing weight and getting in shape are universal obsessions…even the ancient Romans were preoccupied with their figures. If you go on a diet, make sure you eat enough so that you don’t –  in a fit of…

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The March of Time: Selma to Montgomery

Posted by Published on January 22, 2015

2015 marks a half century since the Civil Rights marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. With the release of director Ava DuVernay’s Selma receiving several award nominations, we reflect on the historic fight against segregation and the continuing struggle for equal rights for all. Before you buy your movie tickets, we have surmised a brief history of events that unfolded 50 years ago using the…

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The Reel East-Enders

Posted by Published on December 22, 2014

Next month Britain’s favourite TV soap, Eastenders, turns 30. Love or loath it, this long-running soap opera has become an iconic and firmly established feature in British popular culture. Reaching the number-one spot in UK television ratings within eight months of launching, it has since remained one of the nation’s most popular shows. The everyday lives of Albert Square’s famous heroes and villains have, over…

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No ordinary love: 200 years of Sade

Posted by Published on December 1, 2014

Confined to the mental asylum of Charenton, Sade wrote his last will and testament on 30 January 1806. Even in his own lifetime he was an infamous figure. In the 1760s and 1770s he had existed in the public imagination as a poisoner, torturer and vivisectionist. Now towards the end of his life Parisians came to visit Charenton’s theatre that was directed by the still sulphurous…

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The Christmas Truce of 1914

Posted by Published on December 1, 2014

‘Stille Nacht. Heilige Nacht. Alles schläft, einsam wacht’.  Just after dawn on a cold Christmas day in 1914 one of the most extraordinary events of the Great War was to unfold. It began with carol-singing in the trenches and both sides eventually ventured in “no man’s land” to mingle and exchange gifts. The temporary ceasefire of The Christmas Truce came only five months after the outbreak of the…

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