Category: Culture

As the Chinese say goodbye to the Year of the Horse, we look at some interesting facts to prepare us for this Year of the Sheep! To bring you luck this new year, we’ve listed eight (the luckiest number in China) things you possibly didn’t know about Chinese beliefs and the year ahead. 1. Welcoming the New Year The colourful celebration of the Chinese New…

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Fairy Tales Uncensored: Grim Grimm Stories

Posted by Published on January 16, 2015

No matter where you go, stories of the Brothers Grimm seem to be everywhere, be it the latest Disney film hitting the cinemas, TV series based on their fairy tales or newly reissued print editions. But do you actually know the original stories? The ones where Cinderella’s stepsisters slice off their own toes and Snow White’s mother wanted to eat her daughter’s lungs and liver?…

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Pantone Colour of the year 2015: Marsala

Posted by Published on December 31, 2014

  Pantone describe Marsala as ‘naturally robust and earthy wine red.’ Click through to browse more Marsala images on our Pinterest Annually, Pantone declares a colour of the year forecasting which specific hue designers and consumers will all supposedly be using, wearing, and buying for the following 12 months. With a name like Marsala, food becomes a dominant topic of discussion, yet Pantone refers to…

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The Reel East-Enders

Posted by Published on December 22, 2014

Next month Britain’s favourite TV soap, Eastenders, turns 30. Love or loath it, this long-running soap opera has become an iconic and firmly established feature in British popular culture. Reaching the number-one spot in UK television ratings within eight months of launching, it has since remained one of the nation’s most popular shows. The everyday lives of Albert Square’s famous heroes and villains have, over…

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New Year Resolutions not to Break

Posted by Published on December 19, 2014

It’s that time of year to think up resolutions for 2016. (Well, at least for the first couple of weeks in January). Here’s some inspiration from the Bridgeman archive.   Learn Something New Illustrations from ‘A French Alphabet Book of 1814’/ Charles Plante Fine Arts ‘Yearning to learn French? Aching to put on those dancing shoes and learn tango? Go ahead and sign up and…

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Stuck on fresh ideas for those tricky relatives, high-maintenance best friend or significant other with left-field tastes? To help you decide, we’ve selected our favourite products featuring Bridgeman licensed images – but you may end up adding a few to your own Christmas list…    For: the house-proud home-maker ‘This Christmas I will be buying my cousin, who has moved into her first London apartment, this giclee print…

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No ordinary love: 200 years of Sade

Posted by Published on December 1, 2014

Confined to the mental asylum of Charenton, Sade wrote his last will and testament on 30 January 1806. Even in his own lifetime he was an infamous figure. In the 1760s and 1770s he had existed in the public imagination as a poisoner, torturer and vivisectionist. Now towards the end of his life Parisians came to visit Charenton’s theatre that was directed by the still sulphurous…

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The Christmas Truce of 1914

Posted by Published on December 1, 2014

‘Stille Nacht. Heilige Nacht. Alles schläft, einsam wacht’.  Just after dawn on a cold Christmas day in 1914 one of the most extraordinary events of the Great War was to unfold. It began with carol-singing in the trenches and both sides eventually ventured in “no man’s land” to mingle and exchange gifts. The temporary ceasefire of The Christmas Truce came only five months after the outbreak of the…

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Festive tradition or Bah Humbug? The Krampus is a mythological creature that appears in Alpine folklore and traditions. You may be asking yourself right now: “Who, or what, the hell is Krampus?” Well, “hell” is a pretty good starting place to explain…   A Christmas devil?  The Krampus looks like what one would imagine a devil or demon straight out of hell to look like: a…

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Prisoners of World War I

Posted by Published on November 21, 2014

An estimated eight million men were taken prisoners of war (POWs) during World War I. These prisoners, often scarred by their time in the camps, rarely talked about their experiences later in life. Explore historic images and footage from the Bridgeman archive to get an impression of what reality was like for prisoners in World War I.     Conditions in the prison camps varied from country…

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