Author: Hal McNulty

Hal is a marketing intern, and is preparing to read for an undergraduate degree in Classics.

The portrayal of artistic creation in film

Posted by Published on May 19, 2017

‘The muse is born in pain, thrives on it and loves to inflict it’, said Floridian artist Warren Criswell, remarking on the tethering of artistic brilliance to troubled personal lives. With the imminent arrival of two biopics about great artists (‘Rodin‘ and ‘Cezanne and I’), here is a brief examination of how Hollywood has previously depicted the muse of creation, whether by examining the tumultuous lives…

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Centenary of the Battle of Messines

Posted by Published on May 19, 2017

The Battle of Messines (1st – 14th June 1917) has been called one of the most successful allied offensives in the First World War, noted for its effective artillery tactics, military communication methods and the speed of its gains. With its hundredth anniversary coming up next month, here is an overview of why it was such an important moment. In the aftermath of the Battle of…

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100 years without Egon Schiele

Posted by Published on May 16, 2017

‘All beautiful and noble qualities have been united in me’, claimed Egon Schiele, the centenary of whose death in 1918 is fast approaching. Others have criticised Schiele’s work as grotesque, disturbing and pornographic. An early exponent of the expressionist movement, Schiele’s style is characterised by distorted nudes and autobiographical themes, with such a prolific output of self-portraits as to rival Picasso. About the artist Egon…

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Sporting fashion in the last two centuries has developed to allow women to don clothes designed to meet the technical demands of athletic play. As interest in female sporting competition increased, the hindrances of formal wear were brushed away. Amelia Bloomer, nineteenth century women’s rights activist and advocate for reform in female dress, championed baggy knickerbockers (or ‘bloomers’) in the 1850s for use primarily in cycling….

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Leonardo da Vinci, the Anatomist

Posted by Published on May 4, 2017

Regarded as one of the greatest artists of the Renaissance and the archetypal polymath, Leonardo da Vinci was also an innovator of anatomical science. In his lifetime, he produced 240 drawings and 13,000 words of notes detailing his discoveries about the human body, which, had they been published, would have fast-tracked the Medical Renaissance. With the 500th anniversary of his death coming up in 2019, here…

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Art in the BBC Reith Lectures

Posted by Published on May 4, 2017

In 1948 the BBC established the Reith lectures in honour of the broadcaster’s first director-general, Sir John Reith. Each year leading public figures are invited to deliver a series of radio lectures in their respective fields in order to support Reith’s mission to use the BBC as a national education tool. Famous lectures include Bertrand Russell‘s “Authority and the Individual” and Dr Steve Jones’ “The Language of…

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