And in the morning after the night, 2020, Analogue C Type hand print / Carla Borel

Don’t Miss! The Edge: Roman Road / The Columbia Summer Residency 2020
The Columbia, 95-99 Lancaster Gate, London UK
11 – 13 September
Bridgeman Artist Carla Borel is involved with a residency set up by Roman Road gallery in partnership with The Columbia, a hotel and creative house in Lancaster Gate, London.
”Along with six other artists, I have been sharing studio space at the hotel and working towards an exhibition in the last week of the residency. It has been a wonderful opportunity – to work with Marisa Bellani of Roman Road, as well as the other artists, and also to begin a new series of work. My project has used the hotel as a basis for exploring memory, transience and traces of past guests such as Genesis P-Orridge (the only previous guest that I am aware of meeting), using colour photography (single and double exposures) and items from the hotel’s archive.”

The other artists in the residency are: Tommy Camerno, Thomas Helm, Angélica Pina Lèbre, Jack Laver, Tia O’Donnell, and Shaqúelle Whyte.

Love and Stars (3), 2020, Giclée on Hahnemühle
Photorag / Carla Borel

Art Car Boot Fair
Sunday 20 September
Online Only
Due to the ongoing pandemic, the Art Car Boot Fair has this year adapted to a special virtual edition and a bespoke new online experience. Visitors will need to sign up for member access ahead of the day here: www.artcarbootfair.com

Olympia 2010. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas / Frank Phelan / Bridgeman Images

Frank Phelan: Past to Present II
Cricket Fine Art, 2 Park Walk, Chelsea, UK
9 – 26 September
Artist Frank Phelan has a solo retrospective of over 30 abstract canvases, including new work. The Gallery says: ‘During the 1960s Frank was introduced to, and worked alongside, many of the key figures of the St Ives school. Using finely-tuned colour combinations and shapes, he creates a rhythm and his own vocabulary.’

Future Island, 2020, Oil on Canvas, Gavin Watson / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images

New Light Prize Exhibition 2019 – 2020
Scarborough Art Gallery, UK
16 September 2020
New Light is run by a dedicated group of people who are passionate about the visual arts in the North of England. We rely entirely on donations and sponsorship for funding.
Established in 2010, New Light celebrates and promotes Northern art, supporting both well-known and emerging artists by offering some of the region’s best awards and opportunities with the biennial New Light Prize Exhibition, which is fast becoming one of the UK’s largest and most talked about open exhibitions.
In a bid to make contemporary art more accessible, we also run New Light Art for All – an education programme which includes talks, workshops and school projects. Through the New Light Collection, we aim to make the best in Northern visual arts available to more people, by loaning pieces from the Collection free of charge to public bodies and charities.

On the move, Jasper Galloway / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images

Jasper Galloway – Autumn Show
Chelsea Arts Club, London
22 September – 12 October
Jasper Galloway is an artist known for colour and geometrical shapes, primarily paintings but also collage, combining figuration and abstraction. This latest show compiles much of his latest work, perhaps most notably his abstract paintings.

Susan Ryder / Bridgeman Images

Susan Ryder RP NEAC – Looking Through
1 -16 October
Pall Mall gallery: Open by appointment
Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, instead of a Private View we will be hosting two private Meet the Artist days with Sue at our Pall Mall gallery, on Tuesday 29th and Wednesday 30th September from noon to 6.30pm. The full exhibition will be hung as normal in the gallery.
In line with current guidelines for ensuring the safety of our visitors and staff, we will operate pre-booked viewings throughout both days. To attend an RSVP is essential in order that we can schedule the gallery diary.
To make an appointment to meet the artist or to visit the gallery during the exhibition please contact us by telephone, email or book online here.

Water and Wine, 1981 (gouache on paper), Francesco Clemente (b.1952) / Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia / Bridgeman Images

Francesco Clemente: Bestiary 2020
Maruani Mercier Gallery, Brussels, Belgium
3 September – 17 October
Featuring a series of fourteen paintings created throughout the lockdown, Bestiary 2020 records the passing of the artist’s days during a time of uncertainty, confusion, and anxiety. Each work alludes to the iconography of the dark ages, depicting its own medieval ‘beast’ – fantastic monsters composed of human heads and animal features, such as claws, torsos, or tails. By connecting the present to these medieval monsters, Clemente calls attention to the return of unreason and extraordinary transformation in this moment of crisis.

Different Point of View, 2011 (bronze), Tony Cragg (b.1949) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images

Tony Cragg: Inhabitants
Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Paris, France
10 September – 17 October
One of the world’s most distinguished contemporary sculptors, Tony Cragg explores the complex relationships between the natural and material world in order to create a new sculptural language. Inhabitants features a dozen new sculptures in bronze, wood and steel that connote the movement and transience of elements in the process of transformation. Overlapping, layered structures and complex forms give rise to figurative landscapes that, while inherently physical forms, also point to their absent masses, becoming at once positive and negative structures in space. 

Code of Manners, 1988 (oil on linen), Bridget Riley (b.1931) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images

Bridget Riley
Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin, Germany
5 September – 24 October 2020
Throughout her career, Bridget Riley has continuously redefined the concept of abstraction and its possibilities within the painterly process. By rhythmically dispersing various forms – stripes, circles, triangles, rhomboids, curving bands, et cetera – across the canvas, Riley frees colour and form from their illustrative potential, enabling what she refers to as “pure sight.” This exhibition comprises a selection of new paintings and wall works, as well as significant past works that reflect on the artist’s decade-long relationship with the gallery.

Private Domain, 1969 (oil on canvas), Alex Katz (b.1927) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images

Alex Katz: Dancers and Other New Works 2020
Galerie Frank Fluegel, Nuremberg, Germany
1 July – 31 October 2020
In this new series of dancers’ portraits, Alex Katz examines movement through the cropped frames that characterise his distinct style, focusing on isolated parts of the body suspended in motion. As Frank O’Hara, famed poet and friend of the artist, describes: “For Katz, the image – and his television, billboard, or movie close-up discovery – provided a way of both isolating and abstracting each separate feature, as if it were an arc, a rhomboid, an ellipse, within the psychological unity which the audience imparts to a recognisable form.”

Woman with a Bowl of Fruit (gouache on paper), Béla Kádár (1877-1955) / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images

Unconventional Figures
Rosenberg & Co. Gallery, New York, USA
8 September – 31 October 2020
Unconventional Figures highlights the varied, nuanced approaches that twentieth-century artists took in depicting the human form. From simplified shapes to fully abstract forms, the exhibition explores the many ways in which artists depicted the figure amidst the newfound dynamism of the century. Featured artists include Béla Kádár, Aristide Maillol, Joaquín Torres-Garcia, Georges Valmier, Julio González, Louis Ribak, Peter Kinley, Fred Stein, and Giacomo Manzù.

Untitled (15 Posters), 1977 (gouache and graphite on fifteen sheets of paper), Matt Mullican (b.1951) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images

Matt Mullican: Representing the Five Worlds
Mai 36 Galerie, Zurich, Switzerland
11 September – 7 November 2020
Matt Mullican works in painting, drawing, sculpture, and photography, as well as video, installation and performance art. In the 1980s, the artist focused his main interest on developing a complex system of signs and symbols. The resulting cosmologically based model – in which every ‘cosmology,’ or ‘world,’ is interconnected – remains central to his work, and serves as the framework of this exhibition.

Officer of the Hussars, 2007 (oil on canvas), Kehinde Wiley (b.1977) / Detroit Institute of Arts, USA / Bridgeman Images

25 Years
Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, UK
24 September – 7 November 2020
25 Years showcases the diversity of the gallery’s programme by celebrating new and historic works by each of the gallery’s 29 artists. New works include a highly naturalistic painting by Kehinde Wiley that continues the artist’s investigation into the conventions and hierarchies of classical portraiture; a large-scale painting by Denzil Forrester that captures the vibrance of Jamaica’s nightlife; and a figurative work by Deborah Roberts that explores themes of race, identity, and gender politics.

The Crowning with Thorns; Die Dornenkronung, 1983 (oil on canvas), Georg Baselitz (b.1938) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images

Il Mondo Umano
Galerie Klüser, Munich, Germany
11 September – 21 November 2020
The final instalment in a yearlong exhibition trilogy, Il Mondo Umano examines how human beings understand themselves and their existence. The exhibition, combining painting, drawing, photography, and sculpture, reflects the diversity of approaches to the subject of individual experience. Artists featured include Georg Baselitz, Stephan Balkenhol, Joseph Beuys, Christian Boltanski, James Brown, Tony Cragg, Enzo Cucchi, Gregor Hildebrandt, Alex Katz, Olaf Metzel, Cindy Sherman, Juergen Teller and Andy Warhol, among others.

Dark Woods of England / Tom Hammick (b.1963) / British

Tom Hammick: Nightfire – Presented by Lyndsey Ingram
29 September – 13 November 2020
20 Bourdon Street, W1K 3PL, London
Lyndsey Ingram presents an exhibition of new work by the British artist Tom Hammick. Entitled ‘Nightfire’, this is the gallery’s first solo show of Hammick’s work to be held in their Mayfair space, as well as the first time his paintings are presented alongside his woodcuts, etchings and aquatints.
This exhibition was first planned for spring 2020, but due to lockdown was postponed until the autumn. In the intervening months, Hammick completed this new body of over 20 works in various mediums, as he spent this period in isolation at his home in the English countryside near Battle in Sussex.

The Attendant, 2001 (gouache, pen & ink on paper), Desmond Morris (b.1928) / The Sherwin Collection, Leeds, UK / Bridgeman Images

Desmond Morris: In the 21st Century
Beaux Arts Gallery, London, UK
14 October – 12 December 2020
Featuring recent paintings by the 92-year-old surrealist painter, zoologist, and ethologist, this exhibition marks the culmination of Desmond Morris’s 70-year-long career. As the artist himself describes, “Each individual work is part of a lifelong evolutionary process that I began in 1944 and which I am still pursuing in 2020… If I paint a biomorphic head, it owes much more to the hundreds of my heads that have gone before it”.

Patterns, 2005 (oil on canvas), Michael Borremans (b.1963) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images

Michaël Borremans
Zeno X Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium
28 October – 19 December 2020
In his figurative drawings and paintings, Michaël Borremans juxtaposes sombre figures, close-ups, and still lifes that are at once wistful, darkly comic, and disturbing. While his theatrical staging recalls central themes and motifs of art history, the artist’s unconventional compositions and offbeat narratives are distinctly contemporary.

Paul Rubbishman outside the Colony Room, 2006 / Carla Borel

Tales From The Colony Rooms: Art & Bohemia
Dellasposa Gallery, London, UK
15 September – 20 December
Tales from the Colony Rooms recounts the genesis of the modern and contemporary art scene that was cultivated by the artists who passed through the doors of the Colony Rooms, the infamous private members club for artists and writers in London. Bridgeman Artist Carla Borel has contributed two works for the show and it also presents works of art by Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, R. B. Kitaj, F. N. Souza, Frank Auerbach, John Deakin, Daniel Farson, Bruce Bernard, Nina Hamnett, Isabel Rawsthorne, Michael Clark, Sir Peter Blake, Eduardo Paolozzi, Patrick Caulfield, Darren Coffield, Daniel Chadwick, Amelia Troubridge, David Bailey, Sarah Lucas, Maggi Hambling, Cecily Brown, Marc Quinn, Matt Collishaw, Keith Coventry, and many more artists.

Copy of a daguerreotype of Charles Dickens, original image late 19th century, colourised by Oliver Clyde, 2020 (collodion print), Oliver Clyde (21st century) / Charles Dickens Museum, London, UK / © Oliver Clyde / Bridgeman Images

Technicolour Dickens: The Living Image of Charles Dickens
The Charles Dickens Museum, London
Until 25th April 2021
Marking the 150th anniversary of the Charles Dickens’s death, this exhibition explores the power of the writer’s image. Starting in his own lifetime, we trace his image through artist interpretations, radical rethinking in popular culture and new digital technologies and re-imaginings.
The face of Charles Dickens is well known; you may recognise the wild hair and beard and think of him sitting at his desk. But this is only one version of the many faces and depictions of the famous author. From the start of his career, as people sought to devour his words they also, like any celebrity, wanted to have a piece of Dickens too. People collected his photographs, used his name to advertise products and created admiring fan portraits of the writer at home.
Get closer to Dickens with an array of objects, including fine paintings by masters such as William Powell Frith, delicate Victorian photographs, ink drawings by Automatons, and letters by the man himself telling us what he really thought of sitting for portraits. To celebrate Dickens’s legacy, the Museum has commissioned eight colourised portraits from the Museum’s collection by artist and photographer Oliver Clyde to bring Dickens to new, ‘technicolour’ life. Large scale, and in vivid colour, you will see Dickens like you have never seen him before.
Technicolour Dickens has been created by the Charles Dickens Museum in conjunction with associate co-curators Dr Leon Litvack (Reader in Victorian Studies, Queen’s University, Belfast) and Dr Julian North (Associate Professor in Nineteenth-Century English Literature, University of Leicester).

Read the Museum’s article on our website about the exciting new work for this exhibition here.