Discover a selection of thrilling new exhibitions for the new year – including many online viewings and 3D experiences as galleries look for creative ways to showcase work during the ongoing pandemic.

Still life, 1920 (oil on canvas), Giorgio Morandi (1890-1964) / Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan, Italy / Pinacoteca di Brera, Milano / Bridgeman Images

Giorgio Morandi
Robilant + Voena Viewing Room, New York, US
Online Only

One of the most enigmatic, yet fascinating artists of the 20th century, Giorgio Morandi developed his highly distinctive style drawing on the influence of 15th century Italian painters, such as Masaccio and Piero della Francesca and of French Modernists, such as Camille Corot and Paul Cezanne.
Morandi is often thought of as a painter of bottles, jars and other domestic objects. A still life with a pitcher, some boxes and a garlic-shaped bottle is what often comes to mind when thinking of the artist. The artist’s paintings are often interpreted as a quiet opposition to the chaotic modern world.

The Manhattan Strip Club, 2010 (acrylic, charcoal and pastel on canvas), George Condo (b.1957) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images

George Condo: Drawings For Distanced Figures
Hauser & Wirth, St. Moritz, Switzerland
Online Only

The online exhibition from Hauser & Wirth features a new group of drawings by George Condo which are related to his most recent painting series ‘Distanced Figures.’ Made during the last three weeks, in the artist’s home studio in New York state, these portrait drawings are evocative of the experience of isolation during this unsettling period of social distance. Depicted in crayon, pencil and ink, overlapping figures are layered, combining multiple viewpoints to reflect different emotions occurring simultaneously. Condo describes the figures in this new series of works as ‘distanced from one another or in fact even distanced from themselves.’

Rack 1 ’67/68, 1967, Barry Flanagan (1941-2009) / Private Collection
/ Bridgeman Images

Portable Sculpture
Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, UK
Opening Spring 2021

Portable Sculpture brings together fifteen artists, including Louise Bourgeois, Marcel Duchamp, Barry Flanagan, Mohamad Hafez, Do Ho Suh and Veronica Ryan, with work from 1934 to the present day.
The long history of portable sculpture dates back to the small, carved stones made by nomadic tribes during the Ice Age. A combination of unstable geopolitics and sweeping economic change during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries has made questions about home and identity, migration and travel, or stability and impermanence ever more pressing. The exhibition explores a variety of responses to circumstances in which permanence is difficult to achieve.
A series of research events and activities will accompany the exhibition including a podcast lecture by Dr Jo Melvin.

Suffer Well, 2007 (oil on panel), Glenn Brown (b.1966) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images

Glenn Brown: And thus we existed
Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin, Germany
31 Oct 2020 – 23 Jan 2021 – By Appointment only

Galerie Max Hetzler presents the solo exhibition ‘And thus we existed’ with paintings, drawings and sculptures by Glenn Brown at Bleibtreustraße 45 and the gallery’s new space at Bleibtreustraße 15/16.
One of Britain’s most revered contemporary artists, Brown works across painting, drawing and sculpture, taking as his source material reproduced imagery from art history and popular culture. At the core of his practice is the blending of artistic periods and stylistic genres. Transcending time and pictorial conventions, Brown’s work disarms common distinctions between beauty and abjection, heightening the emotive tension present within.
In his recent sculptural work, Brown incorporates existing bronze and spelter figurines, using them as supports onto which he applies thick chunks and layers of oil paint. Wildly growing into the surrounding space, the paint appears fresh and blossoming, partly covering the supporting sculpture, seemingly absorbing it. As if Brown’s paintings are stepping into the three-dimensional space, these bursting constructions continue the artist’s practice of blurring the boundaries between different mediums, as paintings become sculptures, and drawings, paintings.

Washing line, Arniston, 2007 (oil on canvas), Glen Scouller (b.1950) / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images

The Scottish Show 2021
Painter & Hall, Main Gallery, London, UK
26th January – 12th February

Painter & Hall present their annual selection from across a century of Scottish painting, highlighting their regularly featured artists alongside new contemporary discoveries – and a few historical rarities too, all of which includes a handful of artists represented by Bridgeman Images.
A large cross-section of works from the show can be viewed online, or you can make an appointment to view the show in person.

Drawing No. 206, 1982 (drawing), Nigel Hall (b.1943) / Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, UK / Bridgeman Images

Nigel Hall: Tangled Up in Blue
Annely Juda Fine Art, London, UK
2 Dec 2020 – 20 Feb 2021 – online only

Nigel Hall (b. 1943) is one of Britain’s most distinguished sculptors. Known primarily for sculptures in wood, steel and bronze, both monumental and domestic in scale, his work is concerned with three-dimensional space, mass and line. Hall’s works manifest themselves in organic shapes; circles and interlinking ellipses are a recurring motif, echoing geometry as much as the landscapes, cityscapes and music that inspired them. Citing evocative memories as influences from the bombed-out Bristol of his childhood to the expanse of the Mojave desert, Hall’s abstract and geometric sculptures change according to light and viewpoint. They give as much prominence to voids and shadows as to the solidity of the material; the spaces between his sculptures are important to Hall, and integral to the viewer’s experience. Music plays a large role in Hall’s work, particularly jazz, and he likens the pause between notes to the empty spaces between his sculptures.

Daniel BUREN: Installation dans la cour du PALAIS ROYAL / Photo © Pascal Victor / ArtComPress / Bridgeman Images

Daniel Buren & Philippe Parreno: Simultanément, travaux in situ et en mouvement
Kamel Mennour, 5 r. du Pont de Lodi, Paris, France
5 Dec 2020 – 27 Feb 2021

Daniel Buren lives and works in situ.
Philippe Parreno lives and works in Paris.
Quantum physics tells us that what is true for numbers is not necessarily true for objects. One object plus another object do not always equal two objects. If exhibiting is also a matter of exhibiting oneself—to another—the artists here have decided to appear together.
There is an underlying notion of assembly, of sympoesis: two assembled works that have been elaborated together, connected one to the other, to produce something relating to automation. The exhibition investigates the way things appear and disappear, which is the definition of a ghost or indeed any form that manifests itself. When medieval scribes remembered having already read a sentence they were in the midst of transcribing, they called this feeling a ghost. The ghost was this rereading. It represents the uncertain, the unfinished, but also the reinvented. Such quasi-objects have an unfinished existence. The world is not only haunted by ghosts, it is constantly transformed by them. There’s no way to escape them. No object exists without its exhibition; it responds to a new story or a new dramatisation, it appears in a new ritual.

Isolation of Attitude, 1951 (colour etching), Leonard Edmondson (1916-2002) / Dallas Museum of Art, Texas, USA / gift of the Dallas Print Society / Bridgeman Images

Leonard Edmondson: Signs & Symbols
Findlay Galleries Palm Beach, Florida, US
2 Jan 2021 – 2 Mar 2021

Edmondson’s abstract works are allover compositions in which biomorphic shapes float through an atmosphere of soft colour. Often, his palette consisted of limpid hues of translucent rose, terra-cotta, pink, gray-blue, and yellow. His art is also concerned with cognition; titles such as An Occasion for Surprise and Collateral Ribbon demonstrate his interest in relationships, both conceptual and formal (the latter comprising space and color). His paintings and prints share a delicate line, a concern with the tonal gradations of textured backgrounds, and a refined elegance.

Lucian Freud, Damien Hirst with ‘The Golden Calf’ (2008), Sotheby’s, London, 2008 (photo), David Dawson (b.1960) / Bridgeman Images

Damien Hirst: End of a Century
Newport Street Gallery, London, UK
7 Oct 2020 – 7 Mar 2021 – temporary closure, advance booking only

Newport Street Gallery presents a solo exhibition of early works by Damien Hirst. Titled ‘End of a Century’, the exhibition features over fifty artworks spanning Hirst’s formative years as a student in the 1980s to becoming one of Britain’s leading contemporary artists during the 1990s.
Rarely exhibited together, the works in ‘End of a Century’ will chart the emergence of Hirst’s most famous themes. Throughout his career, Hirst has reflected on the complex relationships between beauty, religion, science, life and death. He has said: “Art’s about life and it can’t really be about anything else. There isn’t anything else.”
Featuring installations, sculpture and paintings, some of which have not been seen before, ‘End of a Century’ will survey some of Hirst’s most iconic series, including Natural History, Spot Paintings, Spin Paintings and Medicine Cabinets.

Pit, 1976 (oil on canvas), Philip Guston (1913-80) / National Gallery of Australia, Canberra / Bridgeman Images

Philip Guston: Transformation
Hauser & Wirth, St. Moritz, Switzerland
23 Dec 2020 – 28 Mar 2021

The visionary art of the American painter Philip Guston (1913-1980) spans half a century and continues to exert a powerful influence on contemporary culture today. Recognised as a pioneer of abstract expressionism before his return to figuration in the late 1960s, for Guston painting was an encounter between thought and feeling, image and idea. Within this exhibition, Hauser & Wirth will present two bodies of work from different periods, abstract (1952-64) and figurative (1968-1977), that together show the depth and complexity of his personal iconography. Available to view in person and online, the significant collection of 19 drawings and paintings reveals Guston’s complete commitment to direct experience, moving between a pictorial language relating to his studio and painting tools, to contemplative motifs of his wife, the poet Musa McKim, and their shared lives together. These deeply personal works transcend everyday experience to present an intimate vision of Guston’s creative process and unique artistic freedom.

Obelisk, 2005 (oil on canvas), Lynette Yiadom-Boakye (b.1977) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Fly In League With The Night
TATE Britain, Liverpool, UK
Until 9th May – online only at present

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye is a British artist and writer acclaimed for her enigmatic portraits of fictitious people. This exhibition brings together around 80 works from 2003 to the present day in the most extensive survey of the artist’s career to date.
The figures in Yiadom-Boakye’s paintings are not real people – she creates them from found images and her own imagination. Both familiar and mysterious, they invite viewers to project their own interpretations, and raise important questions of identity and representation.
Exhibition organised by Tate Britain in collaboration with Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, and Mudam Luxembourg – Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean

Ceremonial Hat for Eating Bouillabaisse, 1936 (b/w photo), Eileen Agar (1899-1991) / Private Collection / Estate of Eileen Agar / Bridgeman Images

Eileen Agar: Angel of Anarchy
Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK
Opens 10th February

Whether dancing on the rooftops in Paris, sharing ideas with Pablo Picasso, or gathering starfish on the beaches of Cornwall, Eileen Agar (b.1899 Buenos Aires – d.1991 London) transformed the everyday into the extraordinary. Her unique style nimbly spanned painting, collage, photography and sculpture, even ceremonial hats. Combining order and chaos, Agar’s work fuses vivid abstraction with imagery from classical art, the natural world, and sexual pleasure.
This definitive retrospective charts her ground-breaking career from the 1920s to the 1990s. From early works influenced by her teachings at The Slade, through her experiments with Cubism and her inclusion in the 1936 International Surrealist Exhibition, to her later compositions of lyrical abstraction, Eileen Agar: Angel of Anarchy features over 150 works.

The offer, 1952 (oil on canvas), Antoni Tapies (1923-2012) / Galleria Internazionale d’Arte Moderna, Ca’ Pesaro, Venice, Italy / Cameraphoto Arte Venezia / Bridgeman Images

Tàpies – Brossa
Galeria Eude, Barcelona, Spain
Until 29 May

Galeria Eude is thrilled to present a dual exhibition of works by Antoni Tàpies and Joan Brossa in honour of the gallery’s 45th anniversary. Tàpies – Brossa features a selection of books, graphic work, and “poem-objects” by these celebrated Spanish artists.