Month: May 2017

The Art of War (1914-18)

Posted by Published on May 31, 2017

Representing the ravaged landscapes and soldiers who would never return, we bring you images by acclaimed artists, vividly chronicling their first-hand experiences of World War One.   British War Artists on the Front Line Official war artists were a select group, contracted to produce images of the war. Their role was to sketch, draw and paint as many aspects of the war and their experience…

Read More

Politics on Film? Yes please!

Posted by Published on May 31, 2017

“Film as dream, film as music. No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.” ― Ingmar Bergman Film has captured our attention for generations. From footage on the battlefield to elections and assassinations, we turn to the reel and relive the moments that have so prominently defined the…

Read More

The year 2019 will mark the 75th Anniversary of D-Day, one of the most historic events in British History. Discover the impact and significant this event had on the winning of World War II. On June 6th 1944, Allied forces launched a full forced attack to regain Nazi-occupied France. This date marked the beginning of The Battle of Normandy. Code-named Operation Overlord, it began the slow and lengthy process…

Read More

Et tu, Brute?

Posted by Published on May 31, 2017

Feeling stabbed in the back by politics? Villain or revolutionary, some of history’s most colourful characters had two faces. Often appearing next to the most powerful players of all time, traitors and acts of treason can alter the course of history for good or ill. Marcus Junius Brutus (85-42 B.C.) and Nelson Mandela (1918-present) were both considered traitors to their governments, but their bold actions helped to change the…

Read More
Art

Masterpieces of Architecture: Kaldor

Posted by Published on May 31, 2017

Paintings of masterpieces of architecture from around the world Trained as an architect in his native Hungary, Andras Kaldor set out to capture the city’s historic landmarks and public spaces, its churches, corporate headquarters, and museums, along with residences of the rich and famous.   Commissions have led Andras to travel all over Europe to document the continent’s most prestigious Opera houses. He also illustrated books of…

Read More

This September is the 130th anniversary of the founding of the Eastman Kodak Company (referred to simply as Kodak). We take a look at a special collection of footage shot by the artist Philip de László, who was gifted one of the first motion cameras by George Eastman, the founder of Kodak.   Brimming with the glamour, grandeur and fun of British high society in the 20s and 30s,…

Read More

The Evolution of the Bicycle

Posted by Published on May 31, 2017

According to some historians it is almost 200 years since the first documented bike ride by Karl von Drais in 1817 and the city of Mannheim in Germany is planning to celebrate this bicentenary with a major exhibition. The answer to the question of who invented the first bicycle often depends upon the nationality of who you ask as over the years many people have contributed ideas and developments.  Let’s take…

Read More

Invented by Accident

Posted by Published on May 31, 2017

Many of the things we enjoy in our daily lives were discovered by mistake. Bridgeman has an impressive collection of imagery relating to invention, innovation, commerce and consumerism. From pre-history and the ancient civilizations to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and early 20th century American industry and from represented collections such as the Hagley Museum & Library, the Advertising Archives, and the British Library, our archive is unmatched. Corn Flakes In 1894 Dr. John Kellogg…

Read More

Hair, Beautiful Hair

Posted by Published on May 31, 2017

From elaborate powdered wigs to carefully sculpted handlebar moustaches, hair is the ultimate fashion statement. Throughout history, people have worn their hair in a wide variety of styles, largely determined by culture, social status and racial identification. Here are a few examples.       Curls In ancient Rome the tendency was to follow Greek styles. Wealthy women wore ornate piles of curls on the…

Read More

The Psychology of Performing Arts

Posted by Published on May 31, 2017

Shakespeare, Marlowe, Racine, Moliere, Chekhov… famous playwrights  whose plays are still performed today and reinterpreted by directors and actors around the world. They were key in transforming many aspects of everything we know as theatre and drama. In the 20th century there continue to be notable practitioners who have invented new methods for actors to use in order to achieve a more genuine performance. “Love the art in yourself and not…

Read More
Back to top