Jimson Weed, 1936-37 (oil on linen) by O'Keeffe, Georgia (1887-1986); 177.8x212.1 cm; Indianapolis Museum of Art, USA; Gift of Eli Lilly and Company; PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR NON EDITORIAL USAGE; American,  in copyright

End of Summer US Museum and Gallery Exhibitons

As summer begins to draw to a close, many are scrambling for that last, memorable summer outing. Why not take a day to explore some amazing art? All of the leading galleries and museums listed below are represented by Bridgeman Images for licensing in the US. Here are the shows not to miss before the end of the summer!

Stag at Sharkey’s: George Bellows and the Art of Sports

May 14 – September 18, 2016

Cleveland Museum of Art

Stag at Sharkey's, 1909 (oil on canvas) by Bellows, George Wesley (1882-1925); 92x122.6 cm; Cleveland Museum of Art, OH, USA; (add.info.: Sharkey’s Athletic Club, located across the street from the artist’s Manhattan studio, was actually a tavern with a back room that accommodated a boxing ring. Whenever an outsider competed at the club, he was given temporary membership and known as a 'stag'.); Hinman B. Hurlbut Collection; PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR NON EDITORIAL USAGE; American,  out of copyright PLEASE NOTE: Bridgeman Images works with the owner of this image to clear permission. If you wish to reproduce this image, please inform us so we can clear permission for you.
Stag at Sharkey’s, 1909 (oil on canvas), Bellows, George Wesley (1882-1925) / Cleveland Museum of Art, OH, USA / Hinman B. Hurlbut Collection

The Cleveland Museum of Art is exhibiting two dozen of American realist painter, George Wesley Bellows masterpieces. Known for his expressive figurative paintings, drawings, and lithographs, Bellows’ work depicts primarily action-packed sports scenes and urban life in America during the early 20th-century. From boxing and tennis to standard seated portraits, Bellows is able to capture the movement and the light that is reminiscent of the works of the Impressionists.

The Cleveland Museum of Art will be celebrating the works of Bellows in this exhibition, which captures the rough, competitive exterior of an America on the brink of industrial change.

 

Passages in Modern Art: 1946-1996

March 13, 2016 – May 28, 2017

Dallas Museum of Art

Untitled, 1952 (oil on canvas), Rothko, Mark (1903-70) / Dallas Museum of Art, Texas, USA / gift of the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated
Untitled, 1952 (oil on canvas), Rothko, Mark (1903-70) / Dallas Museum of Art, Texas, USA / gift of the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated

One of the most prolific exhibitions of the summer, the Dallas Museum of Art’s exhibition Passages in Modern Art: 1946-1996 explores the development and variety of modern art spanning over fifty years. This exhibition encompasses a relatively radical time during the modern art era.

From famed abstract expressionism artist Mark Rothko, who’s bold colors and simple images conveyed his strong emotions,  to neo expressionism painters like Philip Guston with his cartoon-like depictions of abstract ideas, this exhibit represents a timeline that tracks not only the growth and adaption of modern art, but also the ways the past modern artists influenced the more recent.

 

America after the Fall: Painting in the 1930s

Through September 18, 2016

Art Institute of Chicago

Nighthawks, 1942 (oil on canvas), Hopper, Edward (1882-1967) / The Art Institute of Chicago, IL, USA / Friends of American Art Collection PLEASE NOTE: This image is protected by artist's copyright which needs to be cleared by you. If you require assistance in clearing permission we will be pleased to help you. In addition, we work with the owner of the image to clear permission. If you wish to reproduce this image, please inform us so we can clear permission for you.
Nighthawks, 1942 (oil on canvas), Hopper, Edward (1882-1967) / The Art Institute of Chicago, IL, USA / Friends of American Art Collection

Inherently American to its core, America after the Fall is a collection of work from many major artists depicting the United States during the Great Depression. Though all painting during the same time period of the 1930s, each artist brings their own tone and ideals to their work. Artists like Edward Hopper, show a more melancholy view of the country at this time; his paintings giving off the idea of “small town America.” In contrast to Hopper’s empty, yet realistic paintings, the exhibition also includes artists like Thomas Hart Benson, whose work is active and colorful. One does not get a Hopper-esque sense of emptiness when looking at Benton’s work from the time period.

Other artists in this exhibition include heavy hitters such as Georgia O’Keefe, Grant Wood, and Philip Evergood. Each artists included in this exhibition in Chicago brings their own specific take on one of America’s darkest times.

 

London and Edo: Cities on the Rise

April 3 – October 23, 2016

Museum of Fine Arts Boston

The Fine Arts Museum and the Shôjô Fountain at the Second National Industrial Exposition in Ueno Park, 1881 (colour woodblock print), Hiroshige III, (1841-94) / Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, USA / Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection
The Fine Arts Museum and the Shôjô Fountain at the Second National Industrial Exposition in Ueno Park, 1881 (colour woodblock print), Hiroshige III, (1841-94) / Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, USA / Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection

Dedicated to primarily prints and illustrations, this Boston-based show contains works celebrating two of the largest cities during the early 19th-century: London and Edo (modern-day Tokyo). Artists of both Japanese decent and of English decent have their work hung together which highlights similarities between the two metropolises, as well as their differences. Major print-makers and illustrators are represented in this show. Works from Japanese artist Utagawa Hiroshige and works from English artist Rudolph Ackermann are among the pieces in the collection.

Though found on opposite sides of the globe, this show is able to convey the major similarities between two seemingly different cultures. Both countries were on the rise of becoming a mercantile paradise; both unaware of the major industrial change ahead of them.

 

Howard Pyle Murals

August 14, 2015 – December 31, 2020

Delaware Art Museum

Marooned, 1909 (oil on canvas), Pyle, Howard (1853-1911) / Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, USA / Museum Purchase
Marooned, 1909 (oil on canvas), Pyle, Howard (1853-1911) / Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, USA / Museum Purchase

There are nine Howard Pyle murals in total, and they are all currently on view at the Delaware Art Museum. This is an astounding feat for the museum, for the murals have not been displayed for the public simultaneously since the 1930s. Inspired by the work of Renaissance Art, Pyle devoted himself to the study of the masters’ techniques and began the creation of the nine murals in 1903. While the Delaware museum was in possession of the final two murals (Genius of Music & Genius of Art) since 2011, the museum, along with professional restorers, have worked tirelessly over the past five years to restore them to their former glory before setting them up for public view.

 

Kusama: At the End of the Universe

Through September 18, 2016

Museum of Fine Art Houston

Untitled, 1954 (pastel & w/c on paper), Kusama, Yayoi (b.1929) / Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH, USA
Untitled, 1954 (pastel & w/c on paper), Kusama, Yayoi (b.1929) / Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH, USA

Possibly one of the most sought after artists, Yayoi Kusama brings her special touch to the Museum of Fine Art in Houston. Sticking with her vision altering style, Kusama combines two of her works, Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity and Love is Calling into one magnificent display: a seemingly endless room filled with dangling golden lights. Over a loudspeaker, Kusama herself recites a poem in Japanese.

It would not be a Yayoi Kusama piece if it did not contain, in some capacity, polka dots! Known for her use of the pattern, Kusama introduces it into her current installation through the dangling golden lights, which are coveredwith her signature dotty style.

 

Collections in Context: American Art from a Pacific Northwest Collection, 1860-1950

July 1 – September 4, 2016

Timken Museum of Art

Little Girl in a Blue Armchair, 1878 (oil on canvas), Cassatt, Mary Stevenson (1844-1926) / National Gallery of Art, Washington DC, USA
Little Girl in a Blue Armchair, 1878 (oil on canvas), Cassatt, Mary Stevenson (1844-1926) / National Gallery of Art, Washington DC, USA

Over twenty works from well-known artists fill the walls of this San Diego museum. The pieces come from a private collection based in the Pacific Northwest, and the Timken is working in conjunction with the University of San Diego’s University Galleries. Artists such as Mary Cassatt, John Frederick Kensett, and Winslow Homer are present this in intimate exhibition of some of the world’s best figurative painters.

 

J.M.W. Turner

April 22-August 28, 2016

Indianapolis Museum of Art

Falls of the Rhine at Schaffhausen, 1841 (w/c, pen, red ink & grey wash on white wove paper), Turner, Joseph Mallord William (1775-1851) / Indianapolis Museum of Art, USA / Bequest of Kurt F. Pantzer
Falls of the Rhine at Schaffhausen, 1841 (w/c, pen, red ink & grey wash on white wove paper), Turner, Joseph Mallord William (1775-1851) / Indianapolis Museum of Art, USA / Bequest of Kurt F. Pantzer

Up only until the end of this month, the Indianapolis Museum of Art is hosting an exhibition of JMW Turner’s watercolors, as well as his contemporaries work. One of the most profound artists, Turner shocked the world when he left his standard practice of detailed drawings behind and became a painter of elements. His work did not have the tightly, perfect manner is once held. His new found appreciation for interpreting the world around him with a few simple, sublime stokes of paint with seemingly washed out colors can clearly be seen in the water colors he created on show at the IMA.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*